ERGP project - online resources: Academic Development: the Professional Context

The resources contained in this section of the website are focussed on a collection of useful journals that support the role of academic development.

International Journal for Academic Development

https://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rija20

This journal reports on advances in theory and practice, and includes discussions on the development of models & theories for supporting & leading improvements in teaching & learning, & debates current issues at the forefront of educational change.

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Innovations in Education and Teaching International (IETI)

https://www.seda.ac.uk/ieti

Innovations in Education and Teaching International is the journal of the Staff and Educational Development Association. To this end, contributions to the journal should reflect SEDA’s aim to promote innovation and good practice in higher education through staff and educational development and subject-related practices.

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International Journal of Educational Development

https://www.journals.elsevier.com/international-journal-of-educational-development

The purpose of the International Journal of Educational Development is to report new insight and foster critical debate about the role that education plays in development. Aspects of development with which the journal is concerned include economic growth and poverty reduction; human development, well being, the availability of human rights; democracy, social cohesion and peace-building; resilience and environmental sustainability. IJED seeks to help make available new evidence-based theories and understandings as to the extent and nature of educational change in diverse settings. It stresses the importance of appreciating the interplay of local, national, regional and global contexts and dynamics in shaping education and development.

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Barbara Kensington-Miller, Ian Brailsford & Peter Gossman (2012). Developing new academic developers: doing before being?, International Journal for Academic Development, 17:2, 121-133

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2011.616049

A small group of new academic developers reflected on their induction into the profession and wondered if things could have been done differently. The researchers decided to question the directors of three tertiary academic development units about how they recruited new developers, what skills and competences they looked for and how they inducted new appointees into the role. This article interrogates the interview data, employing Winter’s ‘dilemma analysis’ to tease out the ambiguities, judgments and problems inherent in the issues of employing new academic developers. Finally, the authors discuss ways of enhancing the induction experience for new academic developers.

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Shelley Kinash & Kayleen Wood (2013). Academic developer identity: how we know who we are, International Journal for Academic Development, 18:2, 178-189, 

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2011.631741

This paper explores academic developer identity by applying self-concept theory and appreciative inquiry to the personal journeys of two academic developers. Self-attribution, social comparison and reflected appraisals are presented and applied to explain how academic developers form their identities. Sociological principles are incorporated to describe the recursive informing of academic development and developer identities. The presentation of implications positions academic developers as higher education leaders.

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Deandra Little & David A. Green (2012). Betwixt and between: academic developers in the margins, International Journal for Academic Development, 17:3, 203-215,

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2012.700895

Previously, the authors developed a theoretical framework drawing on an early sociological study of migration to explore how marginality – being between cultures – might account for academic developers’ ‘hybrid’ academic identities and help them navigate institutional power dynamics. Based on data from semistructured interviews, this empirical study reports on the extent to which the model captures the structural tensions experienced by developers from multiple countries in their working lives.

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David A. Green & Deandra Little (2013). Academic development on the margins, Studies in Higher Education, 38:4, 523-537

 https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2011.583640

Academic developers have typically moved into development from another discipline, and have been described as ‘academic migrants’. In this theoretical exploration, the authors examine how studies of marginality can add to our understanding of this process of migration, situating their work alongside studies that describe the academy with geo-political and topographical metaphors. They map the different types of marginality affecting academic developers, and draw on Stonequist’s study of migration to explore ways that they, as academic developers, define their ‘hybrid’ academic identities, and how developers may find marginality a beneficial position when working with and around the power dynamics of institutions. Finally, they suggest a new way to conceptualize academic development work, and pose questions for future empirical studies investigating the ways in which a homeland on the margins is simultaneously peripheral and vital.

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Gunnar Handal, Kirsten Hofgaard Lycke, Katarina Mårtensson, Torgny Roxå, Arne Skodvin & Tone Dyrdal Solbrekke (2014).The role of academic developers in transforming Bologna regulations to a national and institutional context, International Journal for Academic Development, 19:1, 12-25

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2013.849254

 Academic developers (ADs) often participate in the implementation of programmes or reforms in higher education. Sometimes they agree with these and sometimes they disagree. This paper discusses possible agentic positions during a genuine policy implementation – the National Qualification Framework at a Norwegian university. Through reflexive interpretation, and by applying concepts from ‘discursive institutionalism’ the process of implementation from the national level to university departments is described and analysed. The actions and arguments of the ADs involved in the process are presented and their educational rationale is described. The ADs’ agency is discussed through educational and political science concepts and in light of power and of a tension between two competing world views: professional accountability and professional responsibility.

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Torgny Roxå & Katarina Mårtensson (2017). Agency and structure in academic development practices: are we liberating academic teachers or are we part of a machinery supressing them?, International Journal for Academic Development, 22:2, 95-105

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2016.1218883

This text taps into an ongoing discussion about academic development. It challenges an image of academic development as precarious and liminal and explores academic development as powerful. Sources of power are described and put into the context of values, ideologies, and policies governing higher education of today. It is our hope that readers will be inspired to problematize their own academic development practices and to reclaim a phase in the history of the profession where members displayed more of a political awareness.

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Boud D. & Brew A. (2013) Reconceptualising academic work as professional practice: implications for academic development, International Journal for Academic Development, 18:3, 208-221

https://doi.org/10.1080/1360144X.2012.671771

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Haigh N (2005) Everyday conversation as a context for professional learning and development, International Journal for Academic Development, 10:1, 3-16

https://doi.org/10.1080/13601440500099969

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Rienties, B., Brouwer, N., Lygo-Baker, S. (2013). The effects of online professional development on teachers' beliefs and intentions towards learning facilitation and technology. Teaching and Teacher Education, 29. 122- 131

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2012.09.002

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Griffiths, V., Thompson, S. & Hryniewicz, L. (2014) Landmarks in the professional and academic development of mid-career teacher educators, European Journal of Teacher Development 37:1, 74-90

https://doi.org/10.1080/02619768.2013.825241

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Nevgi, A. & Löfström, E. (2015) The development of academics’ teacher identity: Enhancing reflection and task perception through a university teacher development programme, Studies in Educational Evaluation 46 , 53–60

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.stueduc.2015.01.003

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Ferman, T. (2002) Academic professional development practice: What lecturers find valuable, International Journal for Academic Development, 7:2, 146-158

 http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1360144032000071305